Modern slavery in the heart of Europe

No need to travel far from EU institutions to find out about migrant labour conditions. At the Arts-Loi Metro station in Brussels, Mohammed, an undocumented Moroccan immigrant, worked for months for 50 euros a day to renovate it, and it was hard labour. You can find his portrait among the pictures…

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Egyptologist Stumbles Upon A Mysterious Pharaoh Head

An Egyptology professor at UK's Swansea University recently stumbled upon a remarkable Egyptian artifact.

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What was the Tet Offensive?

The Tet offensive was a well-coordinated attack against some targets in South Vietnam by North Vietnam led by communist Viet Cong Forces. This attack which saw the U.S. and South Vietnam militaries suffer severe casualties was orchestrated in 1968 during the lunar New Year which is also known as…

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Trump’s Grandparents Came to America

The current U.S. President Donald Trump is proposing some aggressive immigrant regulations that will deter people from coming into the U.S. illegally. From building a wall to proposing a bill that would favor to English speaking immigrants when moving to the United States, the president, and his…

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Lynne Viola's book about The Great Terror of the 1930s

"Stalinist Perpetrators on Trial, Scenes from the Great Terror in Soviet Ukraine" is the title of the Lynne Viola book that narrates the terrors of the 1930s in the Soviet Union. What is The Great Terror? The Great Terror is a time in Soviet history that lasted for 16 months during 1937…

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Who was Rosie the Riveter?

During World War II, Rosie the Riveter became a cultural icon. She represented the women working in factories and shipyards at the time, many of whom produced munitions and war supplies. Due to many of the working men being shipped off to fight in the war, women were encouraged to replace them.…

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The 1918 Flu Pandemic Killed Millions

In the US, the flu season starts late in the fall and lasts until spring. Up to 200,000 are hospitalized during this period, and over the past 30 years, about 49,000 people have died from the flu. However, these numbers are small compared to the deaths that were witnessed during the 1918 influenza…

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Ann Sullivan Lived For Years in a Poor House

Ann Sullivan was born in Feeding Hills in Massachusetts in April of 1866, the oldest child of Alice and Thomas Sullivan. Anne Sullivan contracted trachoma, a bacterial infection of the eye. The disease causes recurring and painful infections that leaves the eyes looking red and swollen. When she was…

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How Times Square became the center for New Year’s Eve

Adolph S. Ochs, The chief of the New York Times, always had elaborate New Years Eve parties. Ochs would set off fireworks from the New York Time’s building headquarters. People flocked from everywhere to this Broadway and 42nd Street junction to watch the fireworks. The crowds grew larger…

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Women’s March During Presidential Inauguration of 1913

We all remember the counter-inaugural marches in Washington during the Donald Trump’s Inauguration where hundreds of thousands of protesters were on the streets engaging in a long-lasting tradition of the American Left making their voices heard. Such large-scale protests, especially when…

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100,000 killed in Mount Tambora volcano eruption of 1815

The eruption of Mount Tambora is the biggest one ever recorded in the last millennium. It started in April, 5, 1815 on the island of Sumbawa in present-day Indonesia. On that day, a cruiser of the British East India Company reported fire in the south. Loud blasts and gunfire were heard across the…

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1868 - Susan B. Anthony fights for woman convicted of infanticide.

Susan B. Anthony is a well-known women’s rights activist who helped organize the first American women’s rights agitators. She was tireless in her efforts giving speeches al around the country to convince others to support women’s rights to vote. She even went as far as taking…

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Why Do Muslims and Jews Have Religious Claims to Jerusalem?

The city of Jerusalem is synonymous with Christianity and has often been mentioned multiple times in both the Old and the New Testaments. However, the 5,000-year-old city has claims in the Jewish and Muslim faiths as well but understanding the connection requires a historical understanding. Jew…

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Artifacts Found While Workers Constructed New Subway Lines in Rome

The city of Rome is over 2,000 years old, and the earth beneath it is a treasure trove of artifacts. Since the construction of the third subway line ‘Line C' started, archaeologists have been busy trying to save and bag artifacts, some of which have been quite impressive. Medieval kitchens…

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How were the images on Mount Rushmore constructed?

Over 75 years ago, one of the most iconic structures in the world was created. The Mount Rushmore sculpture has four of the most respected presidents looking over America’s landscape. As anyone can imagine, building this massive structural wasn't easy and it took a lot of years and over…

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Why is Christmas banned in North Korea?

Christmas for many of us is a beloved, treasured holiday where we exchange gifts with friends and spend time with our family and loved ones, often over a tradition of meals and gatherings. However, in North Korea, this just isn’t done. North Korea is probably the most dangerous country in the…

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8000 year-old winemaking evidence found in Georgia

There is so much in the world being discovered every day that gives us a glimpse into ancient civilization. Scientists found 8000-year-old pots in North Western Iran that indicate people made grape wine in ancient times. The earthen pots was scientifically checked and tested for residue. Some pots…

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Agnes B. Marshall was the “Martha Stewart” of her day

Savory ice cream, intricate toppings, and complex molds are some of the things that you can find in a fancy restaurant. However, did you know that these things were also available in the 19th Century? Agnes Marshall, long before anyone discovered the exceptional culinary skills of Martha Stewart,…

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What is the History of the Fourth of July?

We observe American Independence Day on the Fourth of July every year. We consider July 4, 1776, as a day that speaks about the Declaration of Independence and the introduction of the United States of America as an autonomous country. July 4, 1776 was not actually the day that the Continental…

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Titanic hero given headstone after 75 years

A Titanic seaman and hero during the ill-fated night of April 14, 1912, will finally receive a well-deserved headstone. Robert Hopkins, who died in 1943, was an unsung hero who helped save the group of people traveling in his lifeboat. Since his death, his grave had rested with no headstone since…

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How did the French arrive in Louisiana?

Each state in the United States has influences from different parts of the world. Louisiana is today one of the most diversified states in the country, but everything started from a small French expedition. Until the 17th century, Europeans did not choose to settle in Louisiana because it was quite…

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1986 Space Shuttle Challenger disaster remembered

The 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger disaster is one of those disasters that shocked the world because the world saw it unfolding on live TV. It has been 30 years since this tragedy happened. It not only stunned the NASA agency but also every country that was exploring space travel and the effects will…

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A brief history of Spanish speakers in California

In the 16th Century, the land along the west coast of the United States was explored and settlements were founded by people arriving in ships flying the flag of Spain. Many of the sailors stayed instead of returning to Spain. These Europeans brought many diseases and the local indigenous peoples…

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Battle of Bazentin Ridge: 14–17 July 1916

The Battle of Bazentin Ridge represents the beginning of the second part of the Battle of the Somme. It was launched by the British 4th Army on 14 July 1916. The Germans positions were held by the 3rd Guard Division. At 3:20 a.m. the British started bombarding German lines. After the bombardment,…

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Battle of Dujaila: 8 March 1916

The Battle of Dujaila was fought between the Ottoman and British forces on 8 March 1916. It was one of the battles in the World War I. The Ottoman forces were led by Ali İhsan Bey and Colmar Freiherr von der Goltz. The British forces were led by Fenton Aylmer. The Battle of Dujaila ended with the…

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A General Observation on History

History is of great importance in any human culture or civilization. The technical definition of history is the meticulous study related to the past especially with that of the human race in particular. The etymology of the word comes from the Greek ‘historia’. The literal translation…

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History of Hollywood in USA

The film of the United States, frequently by and large alluded to as Hollywood, has had a significant impact on silver screen over the world since the mid 20th century. Its history is once in a while isolated into four principle periods: the noiseless film period, established Hollywood silver…

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Battle of Sari Bair: 6–21 August 1915

The Battle of Sari Bair is also known as the August Offensive. This battle was the last attempt, fail attempt, by the Britain, to take over control over the Gallipoli peninsula in the World War I. The Ottoman Empire had control over the Gallipoli peninsula. Since the invasion (25 April 1915), the…

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Dinosaurs preferred to stay away from the Equator

The sunlight decides the amount of biodiversity present in the world. We can simply see that equatorial and tropical areas have more biodiversity than colder regions in the world. These areas attract flora and fauna due to high availability of food, water and warmth. But the region was not…

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The War Of 1812 - A Recapitualtion

This war began through heated tension between the United States and Britain. During this time, America was heavily populated with Native American Indians. Believing they were robbed of their land, the American Indians accepted help given to them by Britain. This help came in the form of guns, many…

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Operation Barbarossa

The Operation Barbarossa started on 22 June, 1941. This was the codename for the German invasion of the Soviet Union during the World War II. During the time this operation lasted, more than 4 million of soldiers invaded Russia. The front was 2.900 long. This was the largest invasion in warfare…

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Discover The Power Of Supernatural Forces And Humans Too When You Visit The Stonehenge

The Stonehenge remains one of the most important relics of the Neolithic man. It took more than 1,500 years of concerted efforts on the part of mankind to make the structures. The monument has about 100 huge stones laid out in a circle. There are theories of the site being used as an astronomical…

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Battle of Midway

The Battle of Midway was one of the most important naval battles in the World War II. It was fought in the Pacific Theatre from 4th to 7th June, 1942. This battle occurred 6 weeks after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. The U.S. Navy, was led by Frank Jack Fletcher, Chester Nimitz and Raymond A.…

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Step Into A Pyramid In Egypt For A Dose Of History Coupled With Royalty

The first Egyptian king who stepped forward and built a true pyramid in the shape known today was King Sneferu. He built three pyramids during his lifetime between 2686-2667 BC. But this was only the beginning of the era that saw about 80 pyramids built in Egypt. They were initially constructed to…

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Battle of Moscow

The Battle of Moscow was the fighting on 370 miles (600km) sector on the Eastern Front during the WWII. This name was given by Soviet historians and it is related to two periods. The Battle of Moscow lasted from October 1941 to January 1942. The Soviet had an interesting defensive that frustrated…

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First Battle of the Marne

The Battle of the Marne is also known as the Miracle of the Marne. This was the first battle in the World War I that was fought from 5 to 12 September 1914. It was fought between Allied forces and the German Empire. The German forces in this battle were led by Chief of Staff Helmuth von Moltke the…

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Battles of Lexington and Concord

The Battles of Lexington and Concord were fought on April 19, 1775. They present the first military engagements of the American Revolutionary War. The Battles of Lexington and Concord occurred in the Province of Massachusetts Bay, in Middlesex County. These battles occurred within towns, Cambridge…

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Battle of Cajamarca

The Battle of Cajamarca occurred on November 16th, 1532. It was an ambush in which Francisco Pizarro and a small Spanish force captured Atahualpa, an Inca ruler. Spanish forces kill many of Atahualpa's commanders and counselors, and made the rest of his forces flee. The place of this battle was…

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US navy in the World War II

During the World War II (1941-1945), the United States Navy grew rapidly. It had the main role in the war against Japan and important role in the war against Italy and Germany. Also, British Royal Navy played the center role in the war in Europe. The production of battleships started in 1937. The…

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World War II

World War II was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. It is also known as Second Great War. It included more than 100 million people in more than 30 countries. The WWII was the deadliest conflict in human history. All great powers were included in the war. Eventually they formed two military…

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World War I

World War I (knows also as the Great War), started on 28 July 1914 and lasted until 11 November 1918. During that time more than 9 million soldiers and 7 million civilians died! The war was between two alliances. The Allies were United Kingdom, France and Russia. Their enemies were Germany and…

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Tanks in World War Two

Tanks in WWII were the most used military weapons. At this time they were improved and many new types of tanks were made. Looking at them like on machines, they are very interesting. They can cross through any terrain, can use any fuel you can find, and they can run in almost any condition. But…

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Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad

Harriet Tubman is considered as the Moses of her own people for her courage to escape from slavery alone. But then came back many times to lead more than 300 slaves to freedom. To her own people, she was simply, the “Moses”. She is sometimes compared to Joan of Arc for her charisma and…

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History of BMW

BMW started producing cars in 1929. They bought Fahrzeugfabrik Eisenach, a factory that at that time was producing Austin Sevens under license. BMW’s engineers were very good in developing cars, so they started with an Austin Sevens, and ended with six cylinder luxury cars. The first models…

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The vital part of human existence

History in itself is a large definition with various aspects towards life. It is vital to know the source of every living being, how they were created, when they were created or how some events started. If all these questions are answered in a proper focused manner it becomes very easy for someone…

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Causes of the American Revolution

There are no clear causes that we know of that have stood at the bottom of the American Revolution however as it has happened with all major turmoil money was involved. The entire Revolutionary War lasted 8 years, between 1775 and 1783, and in the end what was left is the country we now know as…

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Modern slavery in the heart of Europe

No need to travel far from EU institutions to find out about migrant labour conditions. At the Arts-Loi Metro station in Brussels, Mohammed, an undocumented Moroccan immigrant, worked for months for 50 euros a day to renovate it, and it was hard labour. You can find his portrait among the pictures…

What was the Tet Offensive?

The Tet offensive was a well-coordinated attack against some targets in South Vietnam by North Vietnam led by communist Viet Cong Forces. This attack which saw the U.S. and South Vietnam militaries suffer severe casualties was orchestrated in 1968 during the lunar New Year which is also known as…

Trump’s Grandparents Came to America

The current U.S. President Donald Trump is proposing some aggressive immigrant regulations that will deter people from coming into the U.S. illegally. From building a wall to proposing a bill that would favor to English speaking immigrants when moving to the United States, the president, and his…

Lynne Viola's book about The Great Terror of the 1930s

"Stalinist Perpetrators on Trial, Scenes from the Great Terror in Soviet Ukraine" is the title of the Lynne Viola book that narrates the terrors of the 1930s in the Soviet Union. What is The Great Terror? The Great Terror is a time in Soviet history that lasted for 16 months during 1937…

Who was Rosie the Riveter?

During World War II, Rosie the Riveter became a cultural icon. She represented the women working in factories and shipyards at the time, many of whom produced munitions and war supplies. Due to many of the working men being shipped off to fight in the war, women were encouraged to replace them.…

The story of historical fiction in terms of Sparta

The historians are divided over their opinion of historical fiction. Developing a story based on true historical character is becoming a norm in films as well as literature. The historians mostly don’t like the fact that writers tend to over exaggerate and manipulate history to catch the…

Sixth Battle of the Isonzo: 6 August-17 August 1916

The Sixth Battle of the Isonzo is known as the successful Italian offensive in the World War I. The Battle of Gorizia is the second name for the Sixth Battle of the Isonzo. It was fought between the Kingdom of Italy and Austria-Hungary. The Italian army was led by Luigi Cadorna. He had at disposal…

Battle of Fromelles: 19–20 July 1916

The Battle of Fromelles was the military operation, conducted by Britain on the Western Front during the World War I. This battle occurred on 19 July 1916 and it ended on the next day. The GHQ (General Headquarters) of the BEF (British Expeditionary Force) ordered to the 1st and 2nd Army to prepare…

The History of Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola is definitely one of the most famous drinks in the world. After more than one hundred years it is still some kind of cult and it seems like it will never stop being one. People all around the world adore this beverage and we cannot blame them since Coca-Cola’s taste is really…

Lake Naroch Offensive: March 18 – April 1916

The Lake Naroch Offensive was fought between March and April 1916. The Russian army had numerical superiority, but they lost. They had severe losses. The Russian army was led by Alexei Kuropatkin and Alexei Evert. They had at their disposal: 480.000 soldiers and 1.000 guns. On the other side, the…

Battle of Hanna: 21 January 1916

The Battle of Hanna was fought on 21 January 1916. It was one of the battles on the Mesopotamian front in the World War I. The battle of Hanna was fought between Anglo-Indian and Ottoman forces. The Anglo-Indian forces were led by Fenton Aylmer. He had, at his disposal 10.000 men. The Ottoman Forces…